15K-Mile 1971 Kawasaki H1 Mach III Flexes Two-Stroke Muscle and Classic Looks

15k-mile-1971-kawasaki-h1-mach-iii-flexes-two-stroke-muscle-and-classic-looks

The sound of its three-cylinder powerplant will immediately let everyone know you’re the real MVP.

Although they may not be as efficient (or reliable) as their more widely-adopted counterparts, two-stroke engines are still great fun. In turn, motorcycles like this 1971 MY Kawasaki H1 Mach III are almost guaranteed to fill the soul of a moto-loving petrolhead with pure joy and sheer satisfaction. The bike looks as if it could really use a thorough scrub, but its analog odometer shows a mere 15k miles (24,000 km).

Moreover, this Mach III comes equipped with a modern battery, reconditioned carburetors and a fresh drive chain, as well as new spark plugs and fuel lines. If an angry two-stroke fiend happens to be your thing, you’ll be thrilled to learn that Kawasaki’s warrior is currently up for grabs at no reserve!

The Japanese jewel can be found on Bring A Trailer, where you may submit your bids until Wednesday, September 15. For the time being, you’d need a little over six grand to become the top bidder, so make sure you check this thing out before the aforementioned deadline is reached.

Now, let’s take a quick look at H1’s technical specifications to get a better idea about what we’re dealing with here. The mechanical samurai is powered by an air-cooled 498cc inline-three mill, with triple Mikuni carbs and a compression ratio of 6.8:1. At about 7,500 spins per minute, the two-stroke brute will feed a peak horsepower figure of 60 ponies to a five-speed transmission.

Upon reaching the rear wheel, this force translates to a healthy top speed of 125 mph (200 kph). The powertrain components are hugged by a tubular steel double cradle skeleton, which sits on hydraulic forks up front and twin shocks at the rear. Stopping power is spawned by drum brakes on both ends. Last but not least, the H1 Mach III will tip the scales at 414 pounds (188 kg) when filled with the necessary fluids.