2002 Ford Excursion With Gold Trim and Lambo Doors Is the Very Definition of Extra

2002-ford-excursion-with-gold-trim-and-lambo-doors-is-the-very-definition-of-extra 

This is arguably the most decorative and decorated truck in America, bearing a name so crude (but funny) that we’re not even allowed to put it in writing. It’s plastered all over the truck, though, so you won’t have an issue finding it out or, for that matter, getting the joke. Franklin Williams might be some sort of a freak when it comes to attention to details, but he’s not exactly subtle – neither in his work nor in the way he named it.

Underneath all that gold plating, custom detailing, and real alligator and ostrich leather is a 2002 Ford Excursion, the long-discontinued competent SUV. Williams bought it a while back as a hauling truck, and it eventually became a family daily. Recently interviewed by Barcroft Cars, he doesn’t say for how long he used it in either capacity, but he credits his son with the idea of turning it into the very extra rig it is today.

Williams started off gradually. As one does. The first mods were a modest lift and, comparatively speaking, equally modest 20-inch tires. But the modified Excursion was already proving a success so he decided to go all in, as the saying goes.

The result is an Excursion like no other, and maybe even a truck like no other. The amount of work that went into it is impressive, even if you’re of the opinion that none of it is good – or good-looking. Williams says that a rough estimate for all the modifications would be anything between $135,000 and $200,000, which we assume doesn’t include the price of the truck. The work is not done yet, either.

So what exactly makes this Excursion so extra, aside from the painfully obvious that it sits incredibly high and flashes more gold than rapper 2 Chainz? With a weight of 14,500 lbs (6,577 kg), the Excursion now rides on massive 42-inch tires on custom 30-inch rims. The wheels are so fancy they could almost pass for oversize jewelry: engraved with Las Vegas-inspired imagery (playing cards, mostly) and featuring custom golden lug nuts so sharp they will cut anyone tempted to try and steal them.

Excursion has a 19-inch lift thanks to Kelderman airbag suspension, customized and powder coated in black and gold. It makes for a very comfortable ride wherever he may take it, though to be sure, he doesn’t take it off road. No one would, considering how much money it cost.

Power comes from a 6-liter diesel engine delivering 600 hp, mated with a 5-speed transmission. Williams says the Excursion handles very well even on turns, and his personal favorite bit is the fact that it dwarfs everyone else on the road.

The body is custom, too, with gold accents and badging over pristine white wherever you look. The grille is a more recent addition, as is the custom logo for which two real swords were used. Even the five-inch exhaust is custom, with gold etchings, as well as the lights and the train horn. That said, perhaps the most unbelievable part about the build is the fact that it has Lamborghini-style doors. They’re the original doors, too, and it took Williams three full days just to work out how to replace the hinges with hydraulics so they open upwards. Seeing the Excursion with the doors open is a sight in itself, perhaps even more impressive than its size or bling-ness.

As flashy as the Excursion is on the outside, it might come as a surprise to learn that the interior isn’t in matchy-matchy white. Instead, it’s decked in black alligator and ostrich leather, including the headliner, and features at least six screens, so that it can become a party-mobile at whim. One of them is a 60-inch curved screen in the rear, which, with the upgraded sound system, makes the truck the perfect “venue” to watch games.

Williams says the truck has won over 100 Best in Show awards and that it’s proven a true people magnet, which is like the cherry on the cake to knowing that he had a dream and pursued it whole-heartedly. In fact, he’s yet to meet one single person who would have something negative to say about it. “Everywhere I go, people just stop me and wanna take pictures, wanna see it go up and down. I haven’t had one hater yet,” he explains. At least, the haters aren’t saying anything to his face.