2022 Ford Maverick Regular Cab With Long Bed Is Nothing More Than Wishful Thinking

2022-ford-maverick-regular-cab-with-long-bed-is-nothing-more-than-wishful-thinking

Essentially the indirect successor to the Courier, the Maverick is only offered with four doors in the guise of a crew cab with a 4.5-foot bed. Taking inspiration from the Courier ute, pixel artist Joao Kleber Amaral took the liberty of removing the rear doors in favor of a long bed.

Based on the XLT trim level, the rendering before your eyes isn’t half bad. It actually promises more cargo volume and a higher payload rating, but on the other hand, the Ford Motor Company isn’t interested in such things. There are two reasons the Blue Oval won’t offer a single cab, starting with the Maverick’s only rival. Considering that the Hyundai Santa Cruz is a crew cab, why would the bean counters in Dearborn make the first move?

Secondly, and most importantly, regular cabs are not as popular as crew cabs. We’ve seen this preference in the full- and mid-size truck segments for quite a few years now. In other words, spending money on researching and developing an unpopular option is the perfect recipe to lose money.

As for the elephant in the room, we also have to remind ourselves that many people buy the Maverick and Santa Cruz because they’re cooler than the crossovers on which they’re based. Given these circumstances, looking forward to a regular cab amounts to nothing more than a delusion.

Manufactured in Mexico in the plant where Ford also makes the Bronco Sport, the all-new Maverick is unbeatable in two ways. The starting price of $19,995 for the XL and the incredible fuel economy of the hybrid powertrain are the culprits. But more importantly, the Maverick helps people that were previously interested in an Escape or a Bronco Sport stand out in the crowd.

The XLT on which the rendering is based is $22,280 while the Lariat costs $25,490 before options and destination charge. Only the available 2.0-liter turbo can be upgraded to all-wheel drive, and the latter is definitely worth your money because you also get independent rear suspension. The front-driven hybrid is rocking a twist-beam rear end with force-vectoring springs inspired by the Fiesta ST hot hatchback that Ford sells in Europe.