Embryon Hyperboat by Lazzarini Design Is a Luxurious, Striking Day Cruiser

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Yachts and their bigger counterparts, super- and megayachts, represent a huge commitment. They cost a lot of money to buy and equally hefty amounts to run yearly operations and basic maintenance. And then too, you might not have the time or the inclination to go out cruising for weeks in a row, so unless you charter them, you’re stuck with a yacht-shaped black hole that sucks money out of your account.

Hypothetically speaking, you could still enjoy life at sea with little compromise in terms of comfort and luxury with a day cruiser. Since we’re on the topic of hypothetical discussions, Italian design studio Lazzarini Design, spearheaded by Pierpaolo Lazzarini, has an intriguing proposition with its most recent concept, the hyperboat Embryon.

Unlike most Lazzarini designs, Embryon is tame in terms of design, proportions and amenities. Coming from the studio that put a gaping hole in the middle of the superstructure of the superyacht The Shape, or created a swan neck-like crane to launch a tender with Avanguardia, and designed the Saturnia superyacht with a secret harbor, Embryon almost feels like a downgrade. That is, until at a second, more attentive glance.

With a total length of 24 meters (78 feet) and a beam of 5.5 meters (18 feet), Embryon stands 4.80 meters (15.7 feet) tall and has a draft of 1.5 meters (5 feet). The design studio is yet to offer specifics on the project, but you can tell Embryon is designed for speed by simply looking at it: the sharp bow is made to pierce through waters, and the sleek but curvy superstructure is elegant and aerodynamic at the same time.

Of course, unlike what you’d get with a yacht, a boat is smaller and, as such, less packed with amenities. Comparing the two is really like comparing apples and oranges, but the idea is that, for an adventurer still looking to getting his or her sea legs, it could be an adequate entry into the club. Of course, Embryon could also work as a tender or day cruiser on a superyacht – in which case, the only thing you have to do is make sure you have room to store it.

Embryon shares the same design language as most Lazzarini designs, in that it’s very sleek, elegant and with a decided futuristic touch. The sides of the hull and superstructure are transparent with a honeycomb design, and they reflect the surrounding environment to protect the guests’ privacy.

Accommodation on board is for six guests and a small crew in separate – and rather cramped – quarters. Below deck, at the foreship, is the master bedroom, with plenty of space and a queen-size bed and ensuite bathroom. The crew bedroom is placed right at the bow, and there are two separate guest bedrooms towards the rear, also with ensuite bathrooms. To maximize available space, the owner could probably ask for this space to be turned into a single guest room, with either a double bed or singles inside.

Up on the main deck, you get an elegant lounge area with two L-shaped couches on either side, and the command center nearby. The beach club features an additional couch for tanning, as well as a swim platform that should make access to and from the water a breeze.

Lazzarini imagines Embryon with diesel-electric hybrid propulsion but, as noted above, the design studio remains mum on specs. It’s a shame really; if there was ever a striking concept that would benefit from further study, Embryon is probably it. Considering the Lazzarini tradition, it’s probably safe to imagine the studio would do just that, if a potential client came along.