National Geographic’s New Luxury Cruise Ship Is a Modern Tribute to Captain Cook

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There are lots of cruise ships out there, but not too many that can blend luxury travel with advanced exploration and photography. So, if all of these things appeal to you, the new National Geographic Resolution might sound like a dream boat. A sister ship to the previous National Geographic Endurance, Resolution was built at the prestigious Ulstein shipyard in Norway, and began its sea trials in August 2021.

The ship’s name is not random, but a tribute to the famous James Cook, the first European to reach Hawaii, and the first explorer to cross the Antarctic Circle. It seems that his favorite ship was called “MS Resolution”. This modern-day Resolution is also meant for exploring, but in a luxurious, comfortable way.

All of the ship’s 69 cabins feature large windows or balconies, private bathrooms, and are equipped with Wi-Fi and individual climate control. Throughout the cruise, the 126 guests can relax in the infinity-style outdoor hot tubs, or at the saunas with ocean views. Besides the typical socializing spaces, such as a lounge with a bar and a gym, the Resolution also features state-of-the-art facilities for various presentations and films.

The modern explorer can take advantage of the numerous water and winter toys, as well as undersea adventures, led by specialists with sophisticated equipment. The expertise of a National Geographic photographer and a certified photo instructor are other perks of traveling on board the Resolution.

Classified for deep access in the Polar regions, this mighty ship was built with the Ulstein X-Bow, an advanced bow that improves fuel efficiency and stability in rough seas, thanks to the zero-speed stabilizers.

The vessel is also equipped with extra-large fuel and water tanks, so that it can operate for extended periods of time in remote areas, where there is no infrastructure.

If you really want to explore the world in style, National Geographic’s modern-day Resolution looks like the best way to do it.