New and Affordable Soltera E-Bike Is Primed To Rock the Urban Hipster Lifestyle

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Folks, you may have heard of Aventon before as they’ve hit the e-bike market quite hard in recent times. One sign that this company made it in such a cut-throat industry is seen in the form of the newest urban mobility machine they’ve just unleashed, Soltera. This sort of movement only sustains the fact that they’re doing something right and that people want their bikes. This time around, Aventon is looking to meet the need of the classy city-rider and has unleashed Soltera to be the bike that gets you around town in this modern age. The way Aventon is doing this is with a bike that’s clean-cut and technologically advanced, not to mention a price tag of 1,200 USD (1,063 EUR at current exchange rates), low enough to get the average human on an e-bike in just a couple of months or so of saving. Best of all, both the step-through and classic Soltera are priced the same. They feature no difference in equipment, not even so much as a shift in weight, all 41 lbs (18.6 kg) of this bike. That’s the total weight of each unit, in case my wording may have led you astray. Overall, Aventon builds Soltera with a double-butted aluminum design and removable integrated battery mounted in the down tube. Like most other city bikes, Soltera uses a stiff front fork, this time, completed from aluminum. Speaking of integrated lighting, take a look at what Aventon did with the seat stay. Pretty neat, no? As for the drivetrain, this is one place where it would seem like Aventon did the market research. Why do I say this? well, each unit is set to run on nothing more than an in-house single-speed design. However, for an extra 100 USD, you can unlock the seven-speed version. However, you’ll also add on an extra 2 lbs (0.91 kg) to the bike, for a total of 43 lbs (19.5 kg). However, let’s not forget that this is an e-bike, so where’s the motor? Mounted at the rear hub, a 350-watt brushless motor is found. While that may not sound like the most powerful around, this should be more than enough for average city rides. A 41-mile (66-kilometer) range sounds well within average distances traveled within urban landscapes. Overall, you’re looking at five levels of assist, selected via a controller within a finger’s touch. At full blast, you’ll be assisted up to 20 mph (32 kph), enough to get the wind flowing through your hair, assuming it’s long. Making it easy to know what speed you’re in, how fast you’re traveling, and battery levels, a backlit LCD display with sync to an app on your device, help you keep track of all essential stats. The remaining secondary components are completed using aluminum as the base material. It’s one of the main reasons why this bike costs as little as it does. Finally, any bike meant for city use needs to do one essential thing: carry items, whatever your groceries may entail. What I’m talking about here is nothing more than the ability to mount racks to this bike, and the rear, Soltera looks as though it’s got the right stuff for a rack. With a clean and straightforward design and a price that won’t make you feel like you have to ride your bike to work (gas prices are soaring), Soltera looks primed to take cover the next urban mobility wave.