Original Lincoln Town Car Turns Into the 1980s Luxury Wagon That Never Existed

original-lincoln-town-car-turns-into-the-1980s-luxury-wagon-that-never-existed

The origins of the Lincoln Town Car might easily be traced back to the 1960s and the Continental line. But for many, the quintessential Town Car is the 1990s stretched limousine Coachbuilt conversion. As for the original, it’s better not to speak ill of the dead…

Mostly similar to the prior model year Continental, the 1981 Lincoln Town Car was introduced as a single model line mash-up of the previous Continental and Continental Town Car iterations. It wasn’t necessarily attractive even by 1980s standards, but there were a few perks that assured it would eventually live a little even into the second decade of the 21st century and across three distinct generations.

Thanks to a standard V8 powertrain, the body-on-frame architecture, RWD setup, as well as large dimensions, the Town Car became highly successful in livery and commercial service. Because it shared a lot of parts with the Ford Crown Victoria and the Mercury Grand Marquis, it was cheap and easy to maintain by taxi companies, for example.

Besides, anyone who lived during the roaring 1990s will remember the Town Car was a regular presence among stretched limousine and chauffeur services. Oddly enough, the predecessor from the 1980s was also very popular… with coachbuilders that converted vehicles into hearses.

It’s quirky indeed since the original Town Car wasn’t offered as a station wagon – only a four-door sedan and a short-lived two-door coupe. Meanwhile, the pixel master behind the jlord8 account on social media has probably taken notice of the Town Car hearses and decided to virtually retcon the Lincoln limousine into a practical station wagon.

It’s a decision not without controversy, as fans are immediately reminded of the hearse connections. Others quickly started imagining what custom builds could arise from this one as well, with ideas ranging from donks to slow-rolling lowriders. Frankly, we first thought of a cool burnout smoke coming from the tiny rear wire wheels…