Well-Kept 1972 Honda CB750 Four K2 Looks Great Wearing Candy Sunrise Orange Paint

well-kept-1972-honda-cb750-four-k2-looks-great-wearing-candy-sunrise-orange-paint 

The fact that we still see plenty of CB750s around today is a genuine testament to their reliability.

I’ve said it before, and I will say it again; few bikes are as legendary as Honda’s reputed CB750 – a machine whose middle name was “innovation.” Not only did this classic icon spawn the UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) movement, but it is also regarded as the very first production two-wheeler to feature disc brakes.

The artifact pictured above is a 1972 MY CB750 Four K2, wearing Grand High Speed GS-11 tires from IRC and a shiny coat of Candy Sunrise Orange paintwork. Within its tubular steel duplex cradle frame, the old-school samurai carries an air-cooled SOHC inline-four mill, which is mated to a five-speed transmission and a wet multi-plate clutch.

With two valves per cylinder, four Keihin carburetors and a compression ratio of 9.0:1, the four-banger is good for up to 67 hp and 44 pound-feet (60 Nm) of twist. A chain final drive is tasked with sending the engine’s force to the rear 18-inch hoop, resulting in a top speed of 118 mph (190 kph). On the other hand, stopping power comes from a single brake rotor up front and a traditional drum module at the rear.

In terms of suspension, the entire structure sits on telescopic forks and dual preload-adjustable shock absorbers. Honda’s pearl tips the scales at 498 pounds (226 kg) when the essential liquids are added, while its gas chamber is able to hold 4.8 gallons (18.2 liters) of fossil juice. Right, we’ve told you pretty much everything there is to know about this bike, so it’s time to reveal why you ought to be excited about this whole shebang.

The CB750 presented in this article’s photo gallery is making its way to the auction block as we speak, and you’ve got until December 2 to check it out on Bring A Trailer. For the time being, the top bidder is offering $7,800 to get their hands on this precious specimen, which sounds relatively modest considering just how tidy it looks!